• R.F Wittmeyer
  • April 9, 2017

In a few years, Illinois motorists might have to start sharing the road with self-driving vehicles. Self-driving cars are common in cities across the United States, mainly in California. Some states have moved to allow these cars to be fully autonomous, meaning no driver, steering, or even backup driver. These cars will certainly be life-changing. But many people still have a litany of legal, ethical, and safety questions about the cars. These cars could lead to a reduction in the number of accidents and deaths on the road.  If they function correctly, this could make everyone’s life safer.

Why the Push for Self-Driving Cars?

Basically, many who favor self-driving vehicles want them because it will make the roads safer. According to those in favor, too many people die while driving, and not just in Illinois. People across the country lose their lives because of car accidents, and researchers are constantly trying to find different ways to prevent this from happening. Human errors and behavior cause over 94% of fatal car accidents in fact. Proponents of driver-less cars feel that this technology can do a lot better. Without distracted drivers at the wheel, self-driving cars cannot drive impaired and will obey the rules of the road.

Self-Driving Cars: Are They Safe?

A current Illinois bill would allow manufacturers of self-driving cares to test these cars on Illinois roads. The sponsor said these cars would make roads safer and would also lead to economic growth. According to researchers, this technology may perform better than humans currently perform and thus make roads safer for everyone.

Additionally, this technology poses a lot of benefits for people who should notdrive anymore.For example, many worry about their elderly parents who cannot drive safely anymore. A self-driving car would allow an elderly person the freedom to safely go wherever he or she want to go.

One last concern about self-driving cars is how safe they are on icy roads. Since the cars drive based on the lane markers, researchers work to find ways to help the cars if snow covers the lanes.

Pushback in Illinois Against Allowing Self-Driving Car Testing

Howeer, motorcycle rights activitsts worry about the safety of self-driving cars. They claim the current bill is incomplete because there is no requirement for the systems to detect smaller vehicles.

According to the group opposing the bill, testers should make certain that the self-driving cars can see smaller objects. Due to weather conditions and their size, self-driving cars may not locate motorcyclists. The group wants to ensure that these cars do not contribute to an increase in motorcycle accidents. However, the spokesperson for GM has assured everyone that it will be a few years before these vehicles are even ready. He asserts the cars will be completely safe before they set out on our roads.

The Future of Self-Driving Cars

Whether people like it or not, self-driving cars are most likely going to become more popular around the country. These cars will probably start similar to a taxi-cab service, but expand beyond that as technology improves and the cars become cheaper to produce.

But what happens with liability if a driver of a self-driving car gets into a car accident? Normally, the injured person sues the driver if the driver has been negligent. Now, if a self-driving car is negligent and gets into an accident, and the driver did nothing besides sit behind the wheel, it is unclear whether or not the injured person can sue the driver of the car.

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